Resources
Monday
Jun132016

In The Courts - Asbestos

In a case heard in April 2016, two companies were prosecuted for the same incident of asbestos disturbance. Why was the client fined alongside the contractor and what can you do to avoid the same fate?

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Monday
Jun132016

Energy Saving - Are you wasting money?

Research indicates that many small and medium-sized businesses are still missing out on potential energy savings. What can be done about this?

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Monday
Jun132016

Mobile Devices - Deadly distraction

An accident in which eleven people were killed was caused because an individual was playing games on his phone. What can be learned from this?

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Monday
Jun132016

Accident Investigation - Tell key staff how to investigate accidents

If one of your employees had an accident would you be confident that the supervisor or manager on duty would know what information to collect, which reports to fill out and so on? Our flow chart will keep them on track.

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Friday
May272016

What training is necessary for a telehandler?

One of our customers has a telehandler which is used by experienced drivers. During a recent inspection the business was told it must provide formal training. Is this really necessary and if so, what’s the minimum required?

Hard Lesson

The business received a visit from an HSE inspector who later sent improvement notices requiring staff to be trained in the use of its telehandler. It was surprised because there had not been any accidents and the inspector had no specific concerns about the way the equipment was being operated on the day.

The Law

Regulation 9 of the Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998 requires that employers ensure that all those who use work equipment have received “adequate” training. To identify what this means in practice it’s necessary to refer to the Approved Code of Practice (ACoP) Rider-operated lift trucks: Operator training and safe use (L117)

Legal Status

Advice provided within an ACoP has a special legal status. If you follow it, you are deemed to have done enough to comply with the law. But if you choose not to and you are challenged, you must show that you complied with the Regulations in some other way. It is simplest to treat an ACoP as if it is compulsory as trying to prove that your alternative method was equally effective is likely to be an uphill struggle.

Approved Actions

L117 states that all operators of telehandlers need formal training: “Employers should not allow anyone to operate, even on a very occasional basis, lift trucks within the scope of this ACoP who have not satisfactorily completed basic training and testing as described in this ACoP.”

Tip 1. Our customer proposed to put their staff through an in-house competency test as an alternative. But the inspector informed them that this isn’t good enough on its own. The trainer and assessor must be suitably qualified. Your only practical option is to use an accredited or registered trainer

Tip 2. Even if your staff already hold a valid basic training certificate there is more to do. You must arrange two further levels of training: (1) “specific job”; and (2) “familiarisation”. There’s also a need for formal authorisation and periodic refresher training.

Note. Familiarisation training is the only part of the instruction programme you can undertake without a specialist instructor. It must be carried out on your premises under the close supervision of “someone with appropriate knowledge”. This could be an experienced supervisor, for example. Your trainer should be able to help you to select a suitable individual.

There are specific requirements for telehandler training, including a strict regime of basic, job-specific and familiarisation training. Having in-house arrangements for assessing competence is no substitute for formal training, though your supervisor may be able to undertake the familiarisation element of the instruction.